WinXP SP2 Firewall

Nice little summary of WinXP SP2 over at OSNews. It seems MS has a new firewall in this release. What interests me is this screen shot. A simple UI for allowing incoming traffic to listening processes is a great idea. However, I doubt a pop-up window is the best way to handle this. I would guess a lot of users will just hit the OK to make the pop-up window go away. A application that had a list of listening programs and allowed the user to select which ones could receive non-local packets would probably be better. A couple of years ago I started working on something like this for Linux. Unfortunately, like a lot of the play projects I start it didn’t get finished. At least I seem to have had a good idea.

Categories
Funny

Sendmail effect

Sendmail effect: Any complex technology which doesn’t come with documentation must be the best available.

I found that little tidbit in Linux Advanced Routing and Traffic Control HOWTO.

Categories
Musings

Easy to what?

Is the term “Easy to use” in the computer user interface (UI) world overloaded? I am starting to think so. Before I go any further take note that the Unix shell is a UI. Graphical UIs (GUIs) are generally considered to be the easiest way to use a computer. But are they? Here is a list of command shell steps to change the email address that gets root’s email on a Fedora Core 2 system:

  • su to root.
  • cd /etc.
  • vim aliases
  • Search for root: (/ is the search key in vim)
  • $ to go to the end of the line.
  • bdw to delete the last word on the line (this is the email address or account name).
  • A to enter insert mode.
  • Type the email address, then press ESC
  • :wq to save the file and exit vim.
  • newaliases to update the aliases database.

That seems like a lot but I timed myself and I can easily accomplish all of these steps in under 30 seconds. What could be easier? I doubt this task could be accomplished in under 30 seconds with a GUI. If you are not fluent in the Unix shell you are probably getting quite angry at me right now. “But I don’t know those commands” you say. This is where the term “easy to use” breaks down. The average computer user is not looking for easy to use. They are looking for easy to discover. The normal computer user does not care if a task takes a little longer than the optimal way. All a normal computer user cares about is the ability to easily easily re-discover the steps necessary to accomplish the task the next time they need to do it. These users don’t want to learn the skills necessary to optimally control their computer. Instead of talking about computer UIs with the term “easy to use” I think it’s time we start talking about “easy to do” and “easy to discover”.